People

Global CoordinatorsAfricaAsia & OceaniaEurope & MediterraneanNorth AmericaSouth & Central America

bild 17 Marie-Jose Gaillard-Lemdahl lågupplöstMarie-José Gaillard

Global Coordinator of LandCover6k 

Marie-José Gaillard is a palaeoecologist specialized in past vegetation, human impact, and cultural landscape history. She studied at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and moved to Sweden in 1981 (postdoc at Lund University). She was a researcher at the Department of Quaternary Geology, Lund University until 1998. She then moved to Linnaeus University and is professor in botany/vegetation history/palaeoecology since 2000. She is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Science since 2011 and Professor Honoris Causa of the University of Tallinn (Estonia) since 2013. Her expertize is in pollen, plant macrofossil, and charcoal analyses, as well as pollen-vegetation modelling. She is interested in the interactions between humans, vegetation and climate in the past. Her studies were conducted primarily in Europe (Switzerland and Sweden in particular), but since 2010 also in Africa (Cameroon), China (temperate zone) and India (SE). Over the years she has had/have collaboration with numerous palynologists/palaeoecologists, and also with archaeologists, historians, and modellers (vegetation and climate). She recently coordinated a European research project on Holocene land cover-climate interactions in Europe. This project achieved for the first time a pollen-based quantitative reconstruction of plant cover over selected time windows of the past. The effect on climate of Holocene deforestation since 6000 years before present was also studied.

morrisonKathleen Morrison

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Asia coordinator for land use & land cover 

Kathleen Morrison (PhD, UC Berkeley 1992) is Neukom Family Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College. She studies the archaeology and historical anthropology of South Asia with a focus on precolonial and early colonial South India. Her interests include state formation and power relations, agricultural organization and change, colonialism and imperialism, landscape history, anthropology of food and stable isotope analysis, urban-rural relations, botanical analysis, Holocene hunting and gathering, and the integration of archaeological, historical, and ecological analysis.

MMMarco Madella

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Asia coordinator for land use & land cover

Marco Madella (PhD, Cantab 2000) is ICREA Research Professor of Environmental Archaeology at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). He studies the socio-ecological dynamics of past human populations from Mediterranean to tropical environments. His interests span from past vegetation histories, origin of agriculture and phytolith analysis, people-plants co-evolutionary dynamics, the modelling and simulation of processes in human behavioural change, and long term trajectories of biodiversity and sustainability in prehistoric societies. Key areas for his work are South and West Asia, and South America.

Nicki WhitehouseNicki Whitehouse

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Europe coordinator for land use & land cover

Nicki Whitehouse (Associate Professor and Reader in Physical Geography, University in Plymouth) is an environmental archaeologist and palaeoecologist. Much of her recent work has been concerned with examining Holocene landscape change in response to natural and human-induced processs but especially the transition to agriculture in the Neolithic and the development of the cultural landscape. She has been concerned with the development of Neolithic agriculture, crops used, chronology, effects on the landscape and ecosystems and its implications for the British and Irish Neolithic. She is also a Quaternary entomologist, using sub-fossil beetles to look at questions of long term ecological change over the Quaternary, focusing on the palaeoecology and biodiversity of forested, grazed and anthropic systems.

Hammer photoEmily Hammer

Global Data Manager

Emily Hammer (PhD, Anthropology, Harvard University 2012) is Director of the Center for Ancient Middle Eastern Landscapes (CAMEL) at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, and Lecturer in Archaeology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. She is an archaeologist who focuses on cultural landscapes, environmental history, and complex societies in the Middle East and South Caucasia. Her methodological expertise is in landscape archaeology, GIS, and satellite remote sensing techniques. Through field research in southeastern Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and Azerbaijan, she has studied the relationship between mobile pastoral and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age, Iron Age, and medieval/Ottoman periods in agriculturally marginal landscapes.

DSC_0060Mats Widgren

Land use coordinator for Africa

Mats Widgren is professor emeritus at the Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University. He has researched the history of agricultural landscapes in Scandinavia and in eastern and southern Africa, from the Iron Age to the present. Among is publications are Settlement and Farming Systems in the early Iron Age (1983), Islands of Intensive Agriculture in Eastern Africa (2004 with John Sutton) and Landesque Capital: The Historical Ecology of Enduring Landscape Modifications (2014 with Thomas Håkansson). He is currently leading a team in the mapping of global agricultural systems 1000 CE to 1800 CE.

morrisonKathleen Morrison

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Asia coordinator for land use & land cover 

Kathleen Morrison (PhD, UC Berkeley 1992) is Neukom Family Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College. She studies the archaeology and historical anthropology of South Asia with a focus on precolonial and early colonial South India. Her interests include state formation and power relations, agricultural organization and change, colonialism and imperialism, landscape history, anthropology of food and stable isotope analysis, urban-rural relations, botanical analysis, Holocene hunting and gathering, and the integration of archaeological, historical, and ecological analysis.

MMMarco Madella

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Asia coordinator for land use & land cover

Marco Madella (PhD, Cantab 2000) is ICREA Research Professor of Environmental Archaeology at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). He studies the socio-ecological dynamics of past human populations from Mediterranean to tropical environments. His interests span from past vegetation histories, origin of agriculture and phytolith analysis, people-plants co-evolutionary dynamics, the modelling and simulation of processes in human behavioural change, and long term trajectories of biodiversity and sustainability in prehistoric societies. Key areas for his work are South and West Asia, and South America.

Andrew_Bauer_pic_reducedAndrew Bauer

Land use coordinator for Asia 

Andrew Bauer (PhD, University of Chicago 2010) is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University, where his research and teaching interests broadly focus on the archaeology of human-environment relations. Andrew’s primary research is based in South India, where he co-directs interdisciplinary fieldwork that draws on remote sensing, geomorphological, paleoecological, and archaeological data to investigate relationships among landscape histories, cultural practices, and the development of institutionalized forms of social inequalities and difference over the last six thousand years. As an extension of his archaeological work he is interested in the intersections of landscape histories with contemporary conservation politics and climate change.

Popova 2015Laura Popova

Land use coordinator for Europe and Asia 

Laura Popova (PhD in Anthropology, University of Chicago, 2006) has been at ASU since 2006 and specializes in the archaeology and paleoecology of Bronze Age Russia. She is affiliated with the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the Melikian Center of Russian, Eurasian, and Eastern European Studies. Currently, Dr. Popova’s research focuses on the politics of pastoral land use, past and present, focusing in particular on Central Asia and Russia.

Yao_headshot_smAlice Yao

Land use coordinator for Asia

Alice Yao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the archaeology of frontier societies in ancient China’s southwest borderlands. Currently she is directing a field project that combines archaeological excavations, paleoenvironmental records, and remote sensing to assess Late Holocene land use and agrarian practices in the highland lacustrine basins of Yunnan. This collaborative work aims to address the interplay between monsoonal variation and contexts of agricultural intensification over the course of 2500 years.

Nicki WhitehouseNicki Whitehouse

Global coordinator, LandUse6k; Europe coordinator for land use & land cover

Nicki Whitehouse (Associate Professor and Reader in Physical Geography, University in Plymouth) is an environmental archaeologist and palaeoecologist. Much of her recent work has been concerned with examining Holocene landscape change in response to natural and human-induced processs but especially the transition to agriculture in the Neolithic and the development of the cultural landscape. She has been concerned with the development of Neolithic agriculture, crops used, chronology, effects on the landscape and ecosystems and its implications for the British and Irish Neolithic. She is also a Quaternary entomologist, using sub-fossil beetles to look at questions of long term ecological change over the Quaternary, focusing on the palaeoecology and biodiversity of forested, grazed and anthropic systems.

Albert Hafner_kleinAlbert Hefner

Land use coordinator for Europe

Albert Hefner is Director of the Prehistory Department and Co-Director of the Institute of Archaeological Sciences at the University of Bern. His research is based in the larger context of landscape archaeology. Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements in lakes and wetlands of the Alpine space and high-alpine ice-patch-sites related to passes are therefore in his focus. Major themes are the evolution of agriculture and early farming societies, house and settlement architectures, dendrochronology and human-environment interactions of prehistoric societies of the Holocene. Albert Hafner studied Prehistoric Archaeology, Social Anthropology and Biology (Geobotany) at the Universities of Tubingen and Freiburg (Germany). Publications on Academia.edu  and BORIS.

pinkeZsolt Pinke

Land use coordinator for Europe

Zsolt Pinke (PhD, Pécs 2015) is a postdoc historian at the University of Pécs and a doctoral candidate in environmental science at the Szent István University in Hungary. He made historical and environmental studies of the Little Ice Age challenges and social responses with a special focus on plain landscapes including quantitative analyses of the medieval settlement abandonment, the transformation of medieval grain composition, the modernization of the Central European agriculture, river regulations and the fluctuations of 13th–21th century land use systems. Hi contributed to landscape evaluation, habitat restoration and historico-archaeological research programs. Publications and CV »

Popova 2015Laura Popova

Land use coordinator for Europe and Asia

Laura Popova (PhD in Anthropology, University of Chicago, 2006) has been at ASU since 2006 and specializes in the archaeology and paleoecology of Bronze Age Russia. She is affiliated with the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and the Melikian Center of Russian, Eurasian, and Eastern European Studies. Currently, Dr. Popova’s research focuses on the politics of pastoral land use, past and present, focusing in particular on Central Asia and Russia.

tf_pointingThomas Foster

Land use coordinator for North America

Thomas Foster is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at The University of Tulsa. His teaching and research uses models of economic behavior to understand how humans react to and manage environmental and social variability and how those decisions in turn affect resources in the biophysical environment. As an archaeologist, he has been using the time depth of archaeological and historical data to test models about resilience and adaptation among the Native Americans of the southeastern United States in response to colonialism and ecological change. He has applied this research to understanding modern biodiversity and environmental management and has been working with PAGES since 2010. He has published this research in three books and in journals such as Human Ecology, Human Organization, American Antiquity, the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, and the Journal of Anthropological Research.

capAndrew Sluyter

Land use coordinator for North America & Mesoamerica

Andrew Sluyter (PhD 1995, The University of Texas at Austin) currently teaches geography and anthropology at LSU, in Baton Rouge. He studies the environmental history and historical, cultural, and political ecology of the colonization of Latin America, the Caribbean, and their borderlands with North America. He has made various contributions to the theorization of colonialism and landscape, the critique of neo-environmental determinism, to understanding pre-colonial and colonial agriculture and environmental change in Mexico, and to revealing African contributions to the establishment of cattle ranching in the Americas from Argentina to Louisiana. He has more than seventy publications, including three research monographs, and serves as the executive director of the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers.
For more information, see his CV.

Wandsnider April 212 cropLuAnn Wandsnider

Land use coordinator for North America

LuAnn Wandsnider is Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her research focuses on human-land interactions at various temporal and spatial scales in North America and relies on synthesizing archaeological data, historic documents, and environmental proxy data. Current projects include investigating the resiliency of human populations and resource management systems in the interior Great Plains during peri-Medieval Climatic Anomaly. In addition, she is studying the human-environment interaction seen for historic colonizers of the Great Plains and the formation of communities in dynamic physical and economic environments. Other research has focused on monumental architecture in early urban contexts in southern and western Turkey as costly signaling fueled by multi-scalar selection.

J IriarteJosé Iriarte

Land use coordinator for South and Central America

José Iriarte is an archaeologist and archaeobotanist whose research interests focus on coupled human-environmental systems, the development of agricultural economies and the rise of complex societies in Latin America. His projects integrate multi-proxy, cross-disciplinary approaches integrating archaeology, palaeoecology, soil science, remote sensing and modern ecology to understand the nature and scale of human impact on tropical and subtropical ecosystems. He currently leads the ERC project PAST (Pre-Columbian Amazon-Scale Transformations) and the AHRC-FAPESP project Je Landscapes of southern Brazil.

umbertoUmberto Lombardo

Land use coordinator for South & Central America

Umberto Lombardo (PhD, University of Bern 2012) is a post doc at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona with an SNF Advanced Postdoc Mobility grant. He is a geographer who studies landscape evolution and human-environment interactions in southern Amazonia during the Holocene. His interests include neotectonics, fluvial geomorphology, paleosols, pre-Columbian agriculture and settlement patterns and the region’s earliest hunter-gatherer occupations.

Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 23.05.16Eduardo Góes Neves

Land use coordinator for South and Central America

Eduardo Góes Neves has a BA in History, University of São Paulo, PhD in Archaeology, Indiana University, Professor of Brazilian Archaeology, Museum for Archaeology and Ethnology, University of São Paulo, He works in the Brazilian Amazon.